• Indonesia’s tsunami has raised fears that another deadly wave could wipe out the few dozen Javan rhinos still living in the wild.
  • There are believed to be fewer than 70 of the critically endangered species in a national park not far from a rumbling volcano that triggered killer wave.
  • None of the animals are believed to have been killed in the disaster — which left more than 400 people dead — but officials are warning that another deadly wave could slam into the stricken region.
  • Plans to find a second home for the species have been in the works for about eight years, with conservationists surveying areas all over Java and neighbouring Sumatra but so far without success.
  • The size of the habitat, climate, food and water sources and safety from poachers are among the key criteria.
  • The rhinos’ current sanctuary in the park comprises some 5,100 hectares (12,600 acres) of lush rainforest and freshwater streams.
  • But, like other rhino species across the world, poaching and human encroachment on its habitat has led to a dramatic population decline.
  • Poaching in particular represents a severe threat, with rhino horns used in traditional Asian medicine fetching ever higher prices on the black market despite a lack of scientific evidence showing the horn has any medicinal value.