• Human activities are changing the environment in a way that causes cancer in wild animal populations, according to a study.
  • We know that some viruses can cause cancer in humans by changing the environment that they live in — in their case, human cells — to make it more suitable for themselves,
  • We are changing the environment to be more suitable for ourselves, while these changes are having a negative impact on many species on many different levels, including the probability of developing cancer.
  • In the study published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, the researchers point out many pathways and previous scientific studies that show where human activities are already taking a toll on animals.
  • These include chemical and physical pollution in our oceans and waterways, release of radiation into the atmosphere from nuclear plants, and the accumulation of microplastics in both land- and water-based environments.
  • In addition, exposure to pesticides and herbicides on farmlands, artificial light pollution, loss of genetic diversity and animals eating human food are known to cause health problems, researchers said.
  • Cancer has been found in all species where scientists have looked for it and human activities are known to strongly influence cancer rate in humans,
  • “This human impact on wild environments might strongly influence the prevalence of cancer in wild populations with additional consequences on ecosystem functioning.”