• Oddly-shaped cucumbers, yoghurts nearing their expiry date, slightly dented cookie packages — that’s what the customers of Nous Épiceries Anti-Gaspi (“We, Anti-Waste Grocery Stores”) can expect to find in the new brand’s shops in Brittany, France.
  • Unlike other stores, they actively fight food waste by selling products that would otherwise be discarded.
  • According to the country’s Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME), the market is huge — in France alone, 10 million tonnes of food are thrown away every year.
  • Industrial producers and manufacturers are responsible for 53 per cent of this waste, while distributors and end consumers toss the remaining 47 per cent into the trash.
  • Throwing away food that is still edible contributes to overexploitation of natural resources such as water and agricultural land.
  • We collect unsold products directly from producers.
  • We now have 200 suppliers, from the small local market producer who delivers his products every two to three days, to a big food manufacturer like Danone.
  • And that number grows every week
  • From fruit to vegetables, pantry staples, drinks, frozen foods, fresh meat or fish, and even beauty and hygiene products (end of series, promotions or damaged boxes), “family of four can buy up to 75 per cent of its groceries in these mini-markets.
  • The selection changes from one week to the next, so consumers must learn to adapt.
  • And though they won’t necessarily find the same brands as at a supermarket, the tradeoff might be worth it, since prices at these anti-waste stores are 30 per cent lower than for traditional brands. In theory, this allows a family of four to save as much as €200 ($227) a month.
  • Indeed, the 10 million tonnes of food thrown away every year in France represent 15.3 million tonnes of CO2-equivalent.
  • Each grocery store prevents as much as 35 tonnes of food from ending up in the trash every month and 81 tonnes of greenhouse gases from being released into the atmosphere.